Fish Tacos and Expats

 

Leaving Coyote Cals, we ventured back onto the roads, encountering some scary trucks and many more dogs. Although we have not figured out a way to avoid the scary dogs on the roads, we have found that most are not trying to bite, and would rather chase. Therefore, if you ride super slow, they are not interested. We are not sure if this tactic works for other wild animals commonly found on the Mexican Road ways. For example, along highway one, there are many cow crossing signs. These signs do not portray a docile friendly American cow, but an angry looking bull with horns. We did not buy into the idea of an “angry bull crossing” until today when we encountered an angry-looking bull staring at us in the middle of the highway. Luckily he found eating garbage to be more exciting than charging us, and we passed un harmed.

After crossing the desert, we found ourselves on the Sea of Cortez, home of the fish taco. We settled into a palapa [ thatched hut made out of palm leaves] at Coyote beach, where the water is 70 degrees, and a beautiful emerald-green. Nestled in a small cove, the beach is surrounded by jagged peaks covered with huge cactus. With dreams of catching and eating a fish, Abe and I took the day off and rented sea kayaks and spear. Without a clue how to spear fish, we headed out to a group of islands in the cove and began to dive. floundering around in the water, we were not even close to getting a fish. I think I even heard a fish laughing at me under the water. Tired, I got of the water onto the kayak and let Abe have a turn. “Good luck” I said. Thinking that Abe was going to suck as bad as I did, I relaxed back in the kayak to soak in some rays. About ten minutes later, I heard Abe yelling from underneath a mask and snorkel. looking over I see Abe holding up a big red snapper stuck on the end of his spear freaking out, having no idea what to do with the fish wiggling on the end of his spear. After successfully getting to the shore we went and bragged about our fish the local Expats, who were drinking beer and smoking cigarettes outside the local bar. We bought fresh tortillas, limes, tomatoes, cilantro, and some cheese and waited for the chef to cook up our fish. Mmmm, the fruits of our endeavors were sweet. Stuffed, we went and passed out in the Palopa, ready of another day of biking, moving towards Loretto! I swear we are still trying to surf! Unfortunately the surf was neither good in the central desert or on the Sea of Cortez. Stay posted as we move back towards the Pacific Coast! Stoked!

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3 thoughts on “Fish Tacos and Expats

  1. DEAR ROBIN, GREETINGS FROM SUN CITY WEST WHICH, BELIEVE IT OR NOT IS ONLY ABOUT A FIVE HOUR DRIVE,STRAIGHT SOUTH TO THE SEA OF CORTEZ. TOWN WE VISITED WAS PUERTO PENASCO OR ROCKY POINT. REASON A BUNCH OF GUYS THERE WAS TO GO FISHING FOR TRIGGER FISH. WE MOTORED OUT ABOUT SEVE MILES IN LONG NARROW BOATS THAT HELD UP TO SIX FISHERMEN PLUS CAPTAIN AND MATE. THE MOTOR WAS A BIG OUTBOARD. POLES AND BAIT WERE SUPPLIED. THERE WERE TWO BIG SINKERS PLUS TWO HOOKS PER LINE. WE LET THE LINE OUT 75 TO 90 FEET STRAIGHT DOWN. BAIT WAS A COUPLE PIECES OF SQUID PER HOOK. WE CAUGHT LOTS OF TRIGGER FISH FROM ONE TO TWO POUNDS EACH. OFTEN WHEN ER PULLED UP THERE WAS A FISH ON EACH HOOK. THEY FOUGHT HARD AND WE HAD TO REEL HARD TO HAUL THEM IN. EVERYONE CAUGHT TEN TO 20 FISH. IT WAS FUN. ON THE WAY BACK IN THE MATE FILLETED THE FISH AS WE MOTORED ALONG THROWING THE CARCASSES TO THE TRAILING GULLS. THE GULLS NEVER MISSED ONE. WHEN WE REACHED SHORE WE PULLED OUR COOLERS FROM OUR CARS, ADDED ICE AND SPLIST UP THE CATCH. TRIGGER FISH ARE FINE EATING. WE STAYED OVERNIGHT IN A MOTEL. ATE FISH TACOS ACCOMPANIED BY CHIPS, CERVEZA AND MARGARITAS. NEXT MORNING BACK TO PHOENIX. HOPE THE CYCLING IS GOING WELL.
    WE ARE ENJOYING YOUR NARRATIVE, AND EAGERLY AWAIT THE NEXT CHAPTER. LOVE GRAMPA.

  2. I’m trying to follow you on Google Earth. Is it possible to give coordinates or town names for a location. Coyote Beach did not show up

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